North of Main: Spartanburg's Historic Black Neighborhoods of North Dean Street, Gas Bottom, and Back of the College
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North of Main: Spartanburg's Historic Black Neighborhoods of North Dean Street, Gas Bottom, and Back of the College

by: Brenda Lee Pryce, Jim Neighbors, and Betsy Wakefield Teter
Release date: Oct 22nd, 2024

New neighborhoods began emerging north of Main Street in Spartanburg, South Carolina in the 1870s as emancipated Black men and women spent their hard-won post-slavery wages to purchase lots and build homes. Read More

Hardcover - $22.95
(ISBN: 979-8-88574-040-1)

New neighborhoods began emerging north of Main Street in Spartanburg, South Carolina in the 1870s as emancipated Black men and women spent their hard-won post-slavery wages to purchase lots and build homes. As the decades rolled by, they and their descendants established a string of neighborhoods encompassing hundreds of houses, stretching from modern day Barnet Park to the edge of Spartanburg Medical Center.

North of Main is the story of how this district rose and how it disappeared. In its pages, meet the pioneering Black men and women who lived and worked in these early neighborhoods: clergymen, educators, newsmen, artisans, attorneys, physicians, activists, musicians, caregivers, and more. In the face of frequent oppression, they laid a strong foundation for those who followed them. The history of the place they built is extraordinary in its demonstration of the heroism, courage, determination, and pride of Black citizens of Spartanburg who built dynamic and historically significant neighborhoods in treacherous times.

Brenda Lee Pryce, Jim Neighbors, and Betsy Wakefield Teter
Author

Brenda Lee Pryce, Jim Neighbors, and Betsy Wakefield Teter

Brenda Lee Pryce is the co-author of South of Main (Hub City Press, 2005). She served as the first Black female state legislator in South Carolina, received an honorary doctorate in humanities from Wofford College in 2023, and is a founding member of the Spartanburg African American Heritage and Culture Committee.

Dr. Jim Neighbors teaches ethnic literature written in the U.S. at Wofford College and co-coordinates the African/African American Studies Program. He holds a Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

A former journalist at four newspapers in the Carolinas, Betsy Wakefield Teter served as executive director of the Hub City Writers Project and director of Hub City Press for 22 years. She edited Textile Town (Hub City, 2002) and numerous other Hub City titles.

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